Directed by Andrei Tarkovsky, 1972

Andrei Tarkovsky's adaptation of Solaris, a novel by the Polish science-fiction writer Stanislaw Lem, betrays the director's general disinterest in conventional SF tropes. His film does honour the mind-blowing outlines of Lem's concept, which deals with a manned mission to investigate a planet-sized extra-terrestrial consciousness. But where Lem speculated about the practical boundaries of human intellect in the shadow of the universe, Tarkovsky opts to explore human feelings of loss and insecurity in the face of mortality. For Lem, the failed Solaris mission is emblematic of the difficulties we humans would have comprehending and communicating with a radically different form of life. For Tarkovsky, the mission re-opens old psychic wounds, flooding us with regret that we weren't better to the people we loved. "Shame [is] the feeling that will save mankind," murmurs protagonist Kris Kelvin near the end of the film. In Tarkovsky's Solaris, we have made contact with the aliens, and they want you to call your mom.

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