The Woman

Directed by Lucky McKee, 2011

Didn't want to miss this after hearing the stories from Sundance, but as it turns out I didn't like this any better than McKee's other films. Tarted up as a feminist parable, the film is a little too gleefully judgmental of a certain category of women that it believes are complicit in their own exploitation. At any rate, the patronizing gender studies mesh poorly with McKee's slapdash directorial technique, and the slow-moving film is saddled with a jarring rock-and-roll song score and an ersatz 1970s editorial style that verges on self-parody. The best thing about McKee is the women he surrounds himself with, and the line-up of Angela Bettis, Carlee Baker, teenage Lauren Ashley Carter, and smoldering savage Pollyanna McIntosh, in a purely physical role, makes this easy enough to watch without quite dispelling the puerile didacticism of the whole affair. Sean Bridgers, too, playing a candidate for World's Worst Dad, has some moments. The performances tug at the story's more interesting undercurrents, trying to pull something up to the surface, and I kept imagining the myriad ways another director might have made something better and more urgent than McKee's awkwardly sunlit mix of deadpan humor and grim endurance test. I'll bet Rob Zombie's The Woman would be something to see.

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